Decades ago, before I became a Myofascial Therapist, I routinely experienced pain when extending my wrists, making exercises like plank pretty difficult. Over time, it passed and returned occasionally, but the recurring episodes were brief and I didn’t investigate further.

Two weeks ago the pain returned with a vengeance to top of my left wrist and did not abate so I had to figure it out. I thought it had been prompted by carrying something quite heavy with my wrist flexed for a long distance. The only confusing part was I would have expected more trouble with my wrist or finger flexors, rather than the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers. That might have been more like carpal tunnel syndrome, which primarily causes numbness, tingling and pain in the fingers.

Although there is a lot packed into a small space in the wrist, it is actually a pretty simple structure that contains NO muscles. I hadn’t fallen or otherwise wrenched it. I was confident there had been no fracture or damage to the bones. It also seemed unlikely I had damaged any of the ligaments of the wrist.

So, I focused on the muscles in the forearm. The tendons arising off these muscles allow us to flex and extend our fingers and our wrist. At first, I relied on my background knowledge of these muscles and worked higher up in the forearm, focusing on compression of Extensor Carpi Radialis  Brevis while moving my wrist through its full range of motion.